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How we can Help

While A.A. is not affiliated with any form of alcoholism treatment, A.A. Treatment committees are essential in carrying the A.A. message into treatment settings where the suffering alcoholic may be introduced to A.A. for the first time. According to the A.A. 2014 Membership Survey, 74% of our members cited treatment or counseling as an important part of their journey to A.A. The local Bridging the Gap program, or BTG, connects the new member being discharged from a facility to A.A. in their community. Clients can request contacts through the A.A. Temporary Contact/Bridging the Gap Request form. A.A. members can serve as A.A. Temporary Contact/Bridging the Gap Volunteers.

Bridging the Gap

Part of Bridging the Gap between a treatment program and A.A. is the Temporary Contact Program, which is designed to help the alcoholic in an alcoholism treatment program make that transition. As you know, one of the more "slippery" places in the journey to sobriety is between the door of the facility and the nearest A.A. group or meeting. Some of us can tell you that, even though we heard of A.A. in treatment, we were too fearful to go. A.A. experience suggests that attending meetings regularly is critical. In order to bridge the gap, A.A. members have volunteered to be temporary contacts and introduce newcomers to Alcoholics Anonymous. The video "Hope: Alcoholics Anonymous," shown to patients in treatment, emphasizes the importance of having a temporary contact as the essential link between treatment and recovery. It is suggested that the temporary contact take the newcomer to a variety of A.A. meetings; introduce him or her to other A.A.s; insure that he or she has the phone numbers of several A.A. members, and share the experience of sponsorship and a home group.

"A.A. for the Alcoholic with Special Needs"
Published by AAWS, 2014